Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Preparing to Impress {Creating a Child's Schedule}

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Yesterday I shared how we use a "Family Command Center" or Visual Schedule to help our children finish the tasks that they need to do.  A Visual Schedule helps the child know what is excepted and what activity is coming next. 

Today I want to help you set up your own schedules and command center.  The examples below are our school-time lists.  Our summer lists are less involved.  

First, decide what each child is to do each day.   These activities should be age and maturity appropriate.  To help you determine a list, look at the Developmental Guides on the ABCJLM website.   

Due to Bubs' processing and memory disorders (age 9), his list is very specific. 

    Morning Schedule:
  1. Put Clothes On
  2. Brush Hair
  3. Brush Teeth (he does this before eating because afterwards is so difficult)
  4. Eat
  5. Medicine/Vitamins
  6. Get Lunch
  7. Shoes
  8. Backpack
  9. Bedroom
  10. Make Bed
  11. Bathroom
   After School Schedule
  1. Take Off Shoes
  2. Wash Hands
  3. Backpack
  4. Snack
  5. Empty Lunch
    ~~Play~~
  6. Therapy
  7. Read
  8. Clothes for Tomorrow
  9. Make Lunch
  10. Feed Fish
  11. Shower
  12. Pajamas
  13. Teeth
Sweet Pea (age 6) is very organized and Type A.  She has a great memory and uses the list more because she likes organization than because she needs it!  It does help her check to make sure she hasn't forgotten something.  You may notice that the order of her morning list is different than Bubs'.
  1. Make Bed
  2. Clothes
  3. Hair
  4. Eat
  5. Vitamins
  6. Teeth
  7. Bathroom
  8. Bedroom
  9. Lunch
  10. Shoes
  11. Backpack
 After School Schedule
  1. Take Off Shoes
  2. Wash Hands
  3. Backpack
  4. Snack
  5. Empty Lunch
    ~~Play~~
  6. Therapy
  7. Read
  8. Clothes for Tomorrow
  9. Make Lunch
  10. Shower
  11. Pajamas
  12. Teeth
Little Man (age 5) isn't in school yet so his list is a little different.
  1. Make Bed
  2. Clothes
  3. Eat
  4. Meds/Vitamins
  5. Teeth
  6. Empty Dishwasher
  7. School
  8. Playroom
  9. Lunch
  10. Quiet Time
  11. Snack
  12. Clothes for Tomorrow
  13. Shower
  14. Pajamas
  15. Teeth
Peanut (age 2)
  1. Make Bed
  2. Clothes
  3. Eat
  4. Vitamins
  5. Teeth
  6. Help Mommy
  7. School
  8. Playroom
  9. Lunch
  10. Quiet Time
  11. Snack
  12. Clothes for Tomorrow
  13. Shower
  14. Pajamas
  15. Teeth
The kids also help with setting/clearing the table every day.  Laundry is also a contribution when needed.  The kids bring the clothes baskets to me as well has help with sorting, folding, and putting away.  I have magnets for these and add them when needed.

Sweet Pea goes through her schedule without assistance.  Bubs needs guidance and reminders to return to his board.  I help Little Man and Peanut. 

How To Create Your Child's Schedule

For a couple of days, write down what you ask your child to do.  Your list will probably look similar to ours with basics like teeth, pajamas, and making the beds but you may have additional activities that you do.  Compile all of the items and place them in a logical order.  These activities can be as specific as needed. 

There are many, many ways to make a Visual Schedule.  The magnets and cookie sheet idea that I shared yesterday is just one option.  Activity charts work well with some children.  I used a flip chart with Bubs for a while when the process was more important than the time.  Pictures work better for young children.  Clker.com is a wonderful website to find free, royalty free clipart. 

The point to the Visual Schedule is that is personalized to that child.  It is different than a family calendar or Mommy schedule.  More on this the rest of the week.

A Visual Schedule takes some of the pressure off mommy to remember everything and places it in the hands of the child to remember what he or she is to do.  It slowly turns more and more responsibility over to the child.  It also cuts down on the "What's next?" questions that can fill a day.

How to Include "School Time" in the Schedule

In the above example, I simply labelled "school."  But I want to break it down a little further to help you understand when the specific learning occurs.  I will use the 5 Year Curriculum in this example because that is what we will cover with Little Man and it is the most detailed of the four curricula.
  1. Make Bed
  2. Clothes
  3. Eat
  4. Meds/Vitamins
  5. Teeth
Drive - Bible Verse, Books of the Bible
  1. Empty Dishwasher
  2. School
Bible
Reading
Handwriting

(Theses items are not covered every day)
Math, Science, Social Science
Letters, Numbers
Visual Perception
  1. Playroom Clean up
During this playtime we will cover the gross motor activities and finish with crafts and fine motor skill activities. 
  1. Lunch
  2. Quiet Time
To begin quiet time we will read (Book of the Week) and cover the sight word
  1. Snack
  2. Clothes for Tomorrow
  3. Shower
  4. Pajamas
  5. Teeth
  6. Family Devos (Bible is again covered with song and verse)
  7. Talk Time with Daddy

Because the child using this curriculum is older, the 5 Year Curriculum contains more sit-down activities.  It also contains more objectives.  I will also be covering the 2 Year Curriculum with Peanut.  He and I will do more play throughout the day but he will sit down during Bible and craft time. 

More examples are available on the Daily Schedule page on the ABCJLM website.

Jessica shared this great idea on the ABC Jesus Loves Me Facebook page:
As far as schedule, I did not use time at that point but 1st, 2nd, 3rd. So we got up whenever we were ready. Once up though we got started 1st breakfast, 2nd get dressed, 3rd do an activity from lessons, 4th outdoor play and so on. This way my son and I could go our own pace vs. Stressing about time slots. Sometimes he'd spend 5min on something other times 10 I let him enjoy what he enjoyed and move on from what he didn't but by keeping with 1st, 2nd, 3rd I stayed on track.
You will see that my final schedule on Friday has clock times included but instead of being weighed down by the seconds ticking away I think of the sections as "blocks" that can moved around or split in half when needed. The times provide guidance for me and helps me finish all that needs to be covered in a day. 

Tomorrow:  Creating Mommy's Schedule


How do you use a Visual Schedule for your child?

2 comments :

  1. Love this, going to try to work on one for my boys! I have an almost 4 year old and almost 2 year old :)

    ReplyDelete

The Our Out-of-Sync Life blog focuses on encouraging women to deepen their spiritual life, simplify daily tasks, and impress Jesus on the children around them.